This post may contain affiliate links. Read my full Disclosure here.

My Biggest Fear {31 Days of #Homeschooling on the Spectrum}

Go.

I’d be a liar if I said I wasn’t afraid for the future.

His future. The other day I talked about the childhood years and how long we have with our kids. It simply isn’t long enough to assuage the waves of worries that can plague my husband and I if we start thinking about the life our son will have as an adult.

My Biggest Fear {31 Days of #Homeschooling on the Spectrum}

An adult on the Autism Spectrum.

My biggest fear is that he won’t find a place to be; a place where he fits and lives and loves and grows old with others who fit and love him. There’s just no way of knowing, and it hurts my heart to think about it.

I have never worried for the future of my kids the way that I do for D1.

He is gullible and trusting. He is loving and kind and would quite literally give someone his shirt and his shoes if he saw they had need. He is scattered and distractible, practically unable to follow through with even simple tasks. He needs cueing and prompting and reminders.

They say that when you have a child, you are allowing part of your heart to go walking around outside of your body. This is true in a sense, but I’ve never felt it so strongly as I do with this child whom I did not birth. His life was given to us, placed in our hands, and when we think of his future it terrifies us. Is he smart and capable? Yes, quite. But he also needs understanding and help and who will do that later?

Oh Lord, he is in your most capable hands. We lean heavily on you because this is something we simply can not do.

STOP.

 What is your biggest fear when it comes to your Autistic kids?

This post is part of a series. Please go to my landing page to read all of them.

This post is linked up with TWO #31Days challenges!

categories: 31 Days of Homeschooling on the Spectrum

Tags: , ,


0 :
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my full Disclosure here.

Where You Go I Go {Sunday Worship}

How could I expect to walk without you
When every move that Jesus made was in surrender
I would not begin to live without you
For you alone are worthy; you are always good

~Kim Walker-Smith, Jesus Culture

Let this be my heart, Lord.

categories: Sunday Worship

Tags: , ,


0 :
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my full Disclosure here.

How Long {31 Days of #Homeschooling on the Spectrum}

GO.

How long is 18 years?

We are given 18 years to raise them and teach them. Homeschooling or not, 18 years is the duration of their childhood years. After that, it all gets REAL.

How Long {31 Days of #Homeschooling on the Spectrum}

18 years to teach filtering and follow through.

18 years to give hugs and bring eye contact into the realm of almost comfortable.

18 years to learn acceptance of limitations and then to help them push past them.

It’s not very long. The years roll along so quickly! One moment we were potty training and the next we were teaching him to shift gears on the Yamaha 125. Looking forward to a driver’s license and his first job, and I look up to see that the 18 years I had is down to 4.

Time moves forward, always forward, and when you think you have all the time in the world you really don’t.

18 years is just the first season of a life, fleeting, gone and remembered through fuzzy childlike glasses.

Not long enough.

STOP.

This post is part of a series. Please go to my landing page to read all of them.

This post is linked up with TWO #31Days challenges!

categories: 31 Days of Homeschooling on the Spectrum

Tags: ,


2 :
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my full Disclosure here.

Learn to Adjust Your Expectations {31 Days of #Homeschooling on the Spectrum}

Today is the 17th, and this is my 16th post in this series. If you’re enjoying it, I would LOVE it if you’d jump in and leave your thoughts on the posts. I’m writing these to spark conversations, so that each of us can help one another out.

If you’re NOT enjoying this series, please don’t disappear on me. I don’t normally write every single day, and never want you to feel like you’re receiving spam (or too many emails) from me! Just ignore the emails and stick with me until the end of the month, when we will rejoin our regularly scheduled programming.

Or something. You know what I mean. Thanks!

—————————————————–

 Learn to Adjust Your Expectations {31 Days of #Homeschooling on the Spectrum}

Homeschooling is in itself a learning experience for us Mommas.

We have to learn to block off our school time and protect it. We have to learn to balance the kids and the laundry and the phone and the piano lessons and the meals and the driving and… well, balance everything really. It’s kind of crazy actually, all the things it seems we manage to do in a day or a week. Or not do, because we’re SO busy.

Homeschooling a kid with special needs is a totally different ball game.

We still have all that balancing to do, right? But we also have these expectations for our kids. We expect them to learn to read or be potty trained or  be able to get 5. Stupid. Math problems. DONE. Without having to sit right there next to our 14 year old.

Or is it just me who is finding herself once again adjusting my expectations?

It’s a trap ladies. Comparing one of our kids to another, or our kids to someone elses. It’s a trap and I think at one time or another, every single one of us falls into it. I know my 14 year old is not capable of getting things done as efficiently as my 12 year old, and yet I still find myself expecting that to happen and I get frustrated when it doesn’t!

All is not lost.

My son will graduate. Deep breath. My son WILL graduate. He will get through his work in his timing to the best of his abilities, because we are homeschooling. We are homeschooling so that he can do this.

RIGHT?

So we took a step back. We had a little family meeting with the boy. He acknowledged he’s letting himself get more distracted than normal, and that he needs to decide what is important to him. (Like Band, Minecraft Club, and his MP3 player.) He needs some accountability and Momma needs to lighten up a bit too.

It’s a two-way street, this adjusting.

Just as nothing horrible happened when he didn’t totally potty train until he was 6, nothing horrible is happening here either. We’re still meeting his needs, his way, in his time.

And leaning on God for the strength and patience, because really, where else am I going to pull that from? Hang in there Mommas! You’re doing this for all the right reasons. Don’t try to take shortcuts when there really aren’t any. Keep doing what you’re doing and learn to make those needed adjustments.

Have you caught yourself pushing too much or expecting more (or less??) than you should be? What are you doing about it?

 This post is part of a series. Go to my Landing Page to read them all.

Linked up with #Write31Days.

31-days4.png

categories: 31 Days of Homeschooling on the Spectrum

Tags: , ,


4 :
This post may contain affiliate links. Read my full Disclosure here.

Normal Life {31 Days of #Homeschooling on the Spectrum}

What is a “normal life?”

Normal is whatever works for your family. It might look like completing one subject per day, because the focus is so difficult to maintain.It may be side by side supervision, advanced planning for everyday activities, and reading labels for potential allergens.

Or it might not.

“Normal” Life {31 Days of #Homeschooling on the Spectrum}

Just as there are no two autistic children who are the same, there is no such thing as a normal—or abnormal—family. What’s normal for you may seem completely strange to someone else. So either we’re ALL normal, or we’re all strange. It just depends on how you look at it.

Homeschoolers aren’t considered normal in many circles. Special needs kids are definitely not considered normal by many. Even girls who ride motorcycles or wrestle may not be considered normal. But what IS normal?

Normal is relative, but for Autism Mommas, normal is how ever we are able to help our kids succeed.

Normal might be stimming, noise canceling headphones, or fidget toys in pockets.

It can look like sensory overload tantrums and sleep training and sitting in the waiting room of the OT’s office for two hours, 3 times every. Single. Week.

It may include keeping your kid well stocked with science kits and encyclopedias, or checking out another dozen books on World War II because it’s the only thing he wants to read about.

It might even be the joy found in hearing your child’s communication app speak to you for the first time.

Joy becomes normal when you find it in every single accomplishment.

Normal life? Yes, I know what that is. So do you.

What makes your normal so much different than someone else’s? Share what’s “Normal” for your family!

This post is linked up with #Write31Days. Visit my Landing Page to read all of the posts in this series.

categories: 31 Days of Homeschooling on the Spectrum

Tags: , , ,


0 :